Stevie Munn: It's the simple things in life

Sometimes, as humans, we make life too complicated. I think occasionally we do this with fly fishing and fly tying aswell. Think of how many good fish there are that are caught on flies that are really simple to make. Spider patterns for one, often they have just two or three materials. We really do over complicate things at times.

Although I am mostly a river angler, I do like my wild Irish Loughs and small still waters from time to time. Traditionally at this phase of the season I make a pilgrimage to one of Ireland's great Loughs; Erne, Melvin, Sheelin or Corrib. I was gazing into a fly box that I use for this type of fishing, looking at the fantastic Irish Lough flies, with their long flowing hackles and blends of seals furs. Many of these flies are little works of art, if I do say so myself. My fly box is an old wooden box that I use when boat fishing, I have had it for over ten years and it suddenly dawned on me there is quite a few flies that I have never even used. There is also a section of this box that I have used a lot of the flies and caught a hell of a lot of trout, and these flies just happen to be the simplest ones in my box. One in particular is a pattern I use when the trout are feeding on buzzers, which forms a massive part of the trout’s diet - The Shipman’s Buzzer.

Shipmans Buzzers were invented by English angler Dave Shipman and work fantastically when the chironomids are hatching and the trout are feeding on the emerging fly. Primarily a pattern intended to be fished in the surface film but I have done well with it in every depth of water. This style of fly can be any colour of your choice to match what is hatching. It is a fly that I would not be without and is in the boxes of many anglers I know. It has a green with orange body, that is locally called by some anglers the Gerry Adams. The original was first dressed in the 1970s and it's a great fly for beginners to tie. When I first saw it I was deeply sceptical, I sort of refused to use it as I fished more lifelike buzzer patterns at the time, but I must confess It was not long before I became a convert to this fly as I had seen many anglers do well on it. I now love it, It is just so simple to make which gives me more time to fish!

Here is how to dress it; tie a piece of white poly-yarn, CDC or foam to the hook shank, tie in a piece of pearl mylar tinsel for a rib, (I also use fine wire on top of the pearl as it makes the fly more durable), dub a fur body, rib the body, whip the head and hey presto, you're finished! Colours are adjusted, and I would advise you to carry them in olive, green, brown, black, and the one I mentioned above.

One of the most versatile chironomid patterns in the world, fill your box - you know you want to.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Stevie Munn works full time in the angling sector as a guide, casting demonstrator, writer and qualified game angling instructor and angling consultant, he has appeared in many angling books, DVDs and angling shows all over the world. He has also fished many places in the world and grew up fishing on rivers and Loughs of Ireland where he often guides. He runs teaching lessons in fly fishing and host groups fishing in Canada, Iceland, Argentina, Ireland, and other parts of the world. You can contact him via email anglingclassics@aol.com or get more info at www.anglingclassics.co.uk